Just use a Simple Photo Frame

Debra Walland1 comment
How to frame a small hooked piece sewing it over an acid free mat card and placing it in a photograph frame.

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Landscapes and Light

Laura Kenyon

I love to hook a great landscape.  To me it is as if I am painting with wool.  I was never a great painter and the use of wool that can be pulled out and changed is the perfect medium for me.  A landscape can be as easy or hard as you want to make it.  

The easiest way is just to hook the picture without much thought given to the issue of light.  This is a perfectly good way to hook a landscape. I have absolutely enjoyed hooking this way and a rug comes out beautiful. You do not need me to read any further if you like to hook this way just trust your instincts and hook away.

If you do want to delve a little deeper, I want to discuss the use of light to increase complexity into your  art. The things to consider are where are you standing if you were in the picture, what time of day is it, what time of year is it and finally where is the light coming from?  If you can take a few moments and ponder those questions. You will have a successful picture.

 Most patterns will make the decision of where you might find yourself standing easy, as that is the perception of the artist, who designed the pattern.  You see the landscape as from where the artist is standing. If you are designing our own pattern think about the light as you design.

Where is the light coming from?  Is it behind you? If the light is at your back the brightest images will be  all the front angles of the objects. Is the light hitting you in the face, in front of you?  The lighter images are more complicated now. Where would the light show through and where would images be in shadow? Coming over the back of the images?  Or is the light from the side? There is a shine from that side of all images. Once you decide the direction do not be afraid to draw lines on the pattern showing the origin of the light to remind yourself as you hook.

I am using the image of a covered bridge and will show you the different ways in which the light would impact the bridge. 

I am using the image of a covered bridge and will show you the different ways in which the light would impact the bridge. 

Light from the Front of the Bridge 

I am standing right in front of the bridge.  The light is behind me. So the light would not show on the back side of the roof.  Every other angle of the bridge would have some light. The front corner would have the most light and then it would scan out darker in both left and right.   The front of the trees will be lighter than the sides. Think everything being lighter from front to back. 

 In this photo the light is still coming from the front of the bridge,but I am standing to the left side.I am standing to the left of the bridge. This light would again reflect brightest on the front of the bridge with the archway.  The trees would be brightest on the left side and then scan darker left to right of the picture. Unless there is an image not shadowed by something in the picture. Say the top of the back tree.

  

Light from the Right Side

I am standing to the right of the bridge.  The light is coming from the right. This light would reflect against the side of the bridge with the front being in shadow.  The water would be brightest on the right and the images would again get darker from right to left.

 

Backlighting

 Here is the light source I used.  I am standing in front of the bridge however the light is coming from the back. The covered bridge is in the shadows.  The light would reflect behind the bridge not in front. The light scans from back to front. You have to think 3-D for this light source more than the other options given.  This is "Babb's Bridge" designed by Jackye Hansen.  It is in the Landscapes and Seascapes pattern collection. Or just search it on the website search.

 

Now it is your turn. Go back and look at your pattern. Go through the same process as I described but think in three dimensions; height, length, and width.  Draw in shadowing and make notes so you can go back and hook without  rethinking the process. 

The most important part of hooking a piece is to take the time to “see” the picture before you hook.  That is the hardest part.  You do not have to have the complete rug planned, but you do need to know where you are going with it. If there is a tree or path you can’t “see” do not worry it will come to you as you hook. Also remember that if you don’t like it you can always change it.  As I said at the beginning, I am no painter but with the versatility of wool I can be an artist.  You can too!

Laura Kenyon

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Hooking like a Post Impressionist Artist

Laura Kenyon1 comment

 

I thought it would be fun to explore some post-impressionism art, especially the use of color and the use of the brush strokes to capture the feeling of the artists of that period in wool.

The art Post-Impressionism era was in the late 1800 to early 1900’s.  Some of the most notable artists would include Cezanne, Van Gogh, and Seurat. These artists rejected the realistic use of color and small brush strokes of the impressionistic painters of Monet and Renoir. 

Post-Impressionists continued to use vivid colors and used a thick application of paint.  These artists distorted both the images and included an arbitrary use of color. The sunflowers below were painted by Van Gogh. Notice the wide brush strokes.

Van Gogh's sunflowers

This is my interpretation drawn by Janet Conner

 

How do we translate this artistic style to rug hooking? The areas to discuss are width of strip, use of color, and use of light.

First the easiest way to translate the wide brush strokes would be with the use of a wide cut of wool.  A wider cut is preferred for the translation of brush strokes but a smaller cut with be fine to translate the color use of post-impressionism.

 

THE USE OF COLOR

This is the most challenging part of a piece.  You can basically use ALL COLORS or few colors in the overall completed rug. While you do not need to decide on everything pick one or two main colors.  I took each motif separately and hooked as if it were the only image on the canvas.  Flowers can be hooked in one base color natural colors but there is a variation and “poison” used in each image.  Use a lot of color.  Take your color wheel and go to an extreme analogous range of that base color.

As an example I have chosen the image of my rug Autumn Bloom rug, designed by Jane McGown Flynn, a Honey Bee Hive pattern. Note that each flower is different but linked.  This is by design in the use of varied colors and “poison”.

 

The colors used for the Echinacea went from red to just shy of green, basically halfway around a color wheel. Here is the helpful hint: use the concept; light, bright, dark and dull. Also use spots and solids.  You will use many colors and it is a great use of all the small pieces we have in our stash.  This gives a large image life.

The Chinese Lanterns use orange, yellows, and purple(veins). The large leaves belong to the Chinese Lanterns and are a yellow green with a few other colors added for effect.  The other leaves are intentionally hooked darker to recede into the background.

The bottom flower was completed last as a Mum type of flower.  As I had worked the purple side of the color wheel for the Echinacea I went with analogous purple to orange(peach) for the Mum.  Notice that this flower is not really defined but the color catches the eye not the light placement or detail.

The next step to consider is the light placement.  Use all your training from fine shading and incorporate it in these motifs.  The difference here is that you are not concerned with the color but the value.  If you want the light to show use a light value on the top pedal under it dark value.  The color does not matter. This is where you can have fun or go crazy.  Let your creative side flow.   Every once in awhile put a strange color in just for the fun of it.

As one last note on color.  Incorporate the colors in more than one motif so your eye will flow from one motif to another.  I used the dark red and orange in all the flowers.  You will also see the leaves have the same brown veins. 

The hardest part was to choose a background.  I went from a peach with a little wash of dark peach to this combination of blue. I found a Van Gogh painting that had a medium dark background against a medium dark painting.  It was perfect.  The image I wanted to convey was dappled shadows.  It took a true solid background to make the motifs stand out.  It also took larger “brush strokes” to calm down the movement.

My final piece ended up all color.  You could absolutely make it anything you want. Just be creative...

And have fun!

Laura

 

 

 

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How to talk about Color

Debra Walland
Defining the words we use to describe color

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Teachers for 2020 at the Eastwood School

Debra Walland

Here is a quick summary of our teachers.  Details are under the Eastwood School tab in the main menu.  Hope you can join us!

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"Colors, like features, follow the changes of emotions'- Picasso

Debra Walland

Let me start by saying I hate Picasso.  He was a bully, a woman-hater, a bad husband and father, and jerk by what I can tell. But, he did some things right.

I like his early work, and once in a while, you can find a quote like this one that is worthwhile to hold on to.

My work is usually full of great chroma and contrast. But I am just coming out of a rough time when not only did I not hook very much, but color did not appeal to me.  I even found myself dressing differently.  I live in the South and there is color everywhere, except my closet.  Lots of beige, black, and gray. 

Things are looking up now but I still see less color in my work.  The pieces seem fine, but not what I did before. Not what I think I really am.  I am dyeing with Cushing dyes instead of ProChem. I guess I still have some healing to do.  But my features -  my smile -  is coming back. And soon will the brights and lights.  Enough of the darks and dulls.

Don't worry, Be Happy-

Debra

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How to Hook a Better Rug

Debra Walland
Not all of us are able to have teachers, here are some self help suggestions for hooking a better rug.

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Hooking isn't just for Rugs Anymore - Sheila Arbogast

Debra Walland
Meet the menagerie of Sheila Arbogast, one of our teachers at the SCRUB Hooking  School in January in Sebring, FL.

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Communicating with color

Debra Walland

Did you ever wonder why all SALE signs are red?  Did you even for a split second be surprised by the red title I used?  Color definitely talks to us.  A choice in color can make our work fly or hide.  The right placement and amount of color can make an immense difference.
So let's just look at a few colors and what they can do.

 

Brown, Gray, and Sky Blue

This is post 9/11 New York. The color choices tell us what we want to believe.  Browns bring out emotions of stability and comfort.  Brown is used to warm the scene,and give it stability.  It is the "down to earth" color. But it also suppresses emotion - like we shouldn't get too comfortable.
Gray is a neutral- it quiets and composes. It also can depress a mood. But it is often used in advertising to convey maturation or timelessnesss.  New York is still standing.
Blue is always known as the color of loyalty.  Sky blue actually can inspire trust and brings out the sense of freedom.    Thank you to Laura Kenyon for letting us borrow her work.

     

 

 

 

Orange, Red, and Yellow

We already talked about the sky blue. Along with freedom, it can evoke joy like in Ann Rudman's little friend.
Yellow is the color of happiness and optimism. That shouldn't be news to anyone but too much yellow can cause anxiety, especially if it is a bright yellow. She used bits of the high chroma yellow, but her gold background is still a yellow. Far from being overstimulating, it actually does induce relaxation. Pay attention to wall colors, we use a lot of creamy yellows and gold in our homes and businesses-the color of wealth!
Red is used by advertisers to draw attention and inspire action, thus SALE! We all know that red is for passion, either anger or love. It is such a strong color that it is often used with a blue or orange tinge, not a true primary. It is an energizing color but can be overbearing and be perceived as violent.
Orange is an interesting color; the combination of yellow and red. It is adventurous and optimistic. Orange is the color of encouragement. Advertisers know that it appeals to young people. It is used to express freedom and draw attention. Too much orange can denote self-indulgence and insincerity.

     

 

We love color!  That is why we are selling hand-dyed wool on the Seaside website now.  It is the same wool we have at shows, so you already know the quality of the Dorr wool we use as a base.  Keep checking back at the site for new wool as we replace sold pieces.

Note: This is a reprint of the latest newsletter.  If you haven't subscribed, add your email address to the bottom of the home page and we will send one about once a month.

Debra -In Living Color (remember where that phrase came from?)

 

 

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No End in Sight

Laura Kenyon
dots and dashes finished rugHow to hide the tails of strips , both at the start and at the end of the strip.

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